Wartime Shelters and Outside Toilets!

As said previously, this shed behind me was the Andersen Shelter that was issued to all homes during the war. This was ours after the end of the war, when most people – like us – re-located their shelter to a more convenient positioning in their garden. Also, the shelters were half above-ground and half below ground during the war. Most people grew either vegetables or flowers on the roof of their shelter. We had marigolds on ours.

File picture

This was our Gran’s shelter in it’s wartime positioning, with Gran and Grand-dad posing!

We also had ‘outside’ toilets’ – meaning that they were halfway down the ruddy garden. We kids didn’t much like going to the toilet at night-time, I can tell you! Especially when Richard Woollacott would hurl clods of grass at the toilet door from his garden. Frightened the life out of us. And…..wasn’t much fun when the two old biddies next-door to us were in their adjoining toilet!!! The noises and mutterings were quite unbelievable. ‘Twas all we could do not to burst out laughing!

This pic is of my Aunt Frances outside their toilet, which was opposite their shelter.

The house in the background was George Owen’s farm in Whitestone Lane. Further along was Tom Brace’s stables.

The wooden shed on the left of the pic, was Gran’s neighbours’ pigeon loft. That was Granny Rosser’s and the Thrush family.

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Categories: Uncategorized | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “Wartime Shelters and Outside Toilets!

  1. I love the history! Keep it coming!
    …by the way…I’m not quite older than dirt, but have been told I’m so old I fart dust! 😉

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